Sunday, February 13, 2011

Cecropia and Lunar Moths of the Vermilon River. A Post to Scenic Sunday.

Cecropia Moth likely male.


Tired of birds and scenery for the moment, here's something a little different.


The Cecropia Moth is our largest native moth. I said male because the antennae on this fellow are larger, and purposely so to detect female pheromones to facilitate breeding.The moth has only one full generation per year.


Luna Moth

A large but not as large as the cecropia the Luna Moth may have a wing span up to 4.5 inches. It is resident in Canada from Manitoba to the Maritimes and in the US from the great plains east, and south to northern Mexico. They also produce only one generation per year, except in New Jersey and  New York where they produce two. They have no mouth as the adult stage is for breeding only.


For further Information see http://en.wikipedia.org/Hyalophora_cecropia and see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actias_luna

A post to Scenic Sunday. For more sites go to http://scenicsunday.blogspot.com/

32 comments:

  1. Oh, I can't wait until we actually have a chance to see them again.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've seen a cercropia moth once and what a beauty, but that was before the days of digital cameras. Hoping to see some in the upcoming season.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Great shots! The large moths like these always seem to me to be more than just insects somehow... the size/mass of them and their "fuzziness" almost gives them a vertebrate feel!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Great shots! Never seen a Luna Moth up close, in person!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nice captures, I rarely see moths and even butterflys see less common than when I was a child.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Beautiful images Gary. Digital photography can lead you off in so many different directions. I read up on all I see and am still amazed that I can read,view and learn so much via the internet. 55 next saturday and wondering what my life would have been like if I was 30 years younger.

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a beauty, I've never seen one.

    ReplyDelete
  8. We have the Luna's moths here in GA but I haven't seen the Cecropia. Great change-up Gary!

    ReplyDelete
  9. I don't know why but whenever I see moth, I have horrible goosebumps on my arms. But the funny part is I cannot help staring at them since they are beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Wow how funny, big and strange these moths are! I had never seen something similar! Wow, pretty cool and interesting! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  11. I've never seen the Cecropia Moth, but I have seen it in it's caterpillar form and it is the most amazing!!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. So cool! I havne't seen the first one before, but I've seen a few Lunas. and I love 'em! They are gorgeous, hands down.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Louise. There's a blizzard here today so I'd sure love to see them again.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I hope to see some more too CG.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi John S. Glad you enjoyed them.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi Lorac. It's the size of these guys and their colours

    ReplyDelete
  17. That's too bad Martha Z. I hope you see some this year.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Boom and I love our rambles too Andrew. At 55 you're just a kid.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi Bob. Now you're going to have to look for butterflies or moths to post.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi Jean. Thanks for the visit!!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Yoshi. They don't seem to have the "good" reputation of the butterfly do they.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi Chris. Good to see you up and around, and you're right they're memorable.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi Kahooly and the caterpiller is even stranger looking isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  24. Hi Johnny. I have not seen very many of them either.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Such gorgeous moths! Interesting to learn something about them.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Hi eileeninmd and thanks for the compliments.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Hi Mary. They are awesome aren't they?

    ReplyDelete
  28. Thanks for your photos reminding me of these two beautiful moths. We have both, but the luna is much more common. (BTW: Down here in the southern US, luna moths usually produce three generations per year from March to September. BugGuide)

    ReplyDelete
  29. Hi eileeninmd. Beauties aren't they?

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi Mary. They're an interesting species.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Hi Marvin. That must mean they've adapted to the region then. Interesting . Thanks for the info.

    ReplyDelete