Tuesday, July 12, 2011

New And Old Friends of the Vermilon River. A Post to WBW

Yellow Warbler
This post started off as a new friends post, but I ran into instant problems. Should that include winter birds, the new black birds, woodpeckers,swallows etc.; and I'm in a negative mood with Blogger and its dictatorial, and its incompetent ways. So the post became a sort of new warbler post with some other friends included. I'll just explain why I put them in. I think seeing all these new birds is the result of having the new lens, the healthy state of the forest, and global warming which is bringing new wildlife this way. The yellow Warbler is new for me and our ten mile stretch that we travel in.( For new readers the forest runs for hundreds of miles as I explained in another post, but we limit ourselves to a ten mile stretch.)




Yellow Warbler


American Redstart.



American Redstarts are not new to me or the area, but this is the first time I have been able to capture them so well.

American Redstart.



I think the lens makes quite a difference, because all these birds are small and the forest canopy is thick. It's one thing to see them, but it's a double thrill to have good photos of them. Redstarts are warblers by the way.

Common Yellowthroat.



This was a real thrill as the Common Yellowthroats are new to me. And the colours are so vivid.

Common Yellowthroat.


Yellow-rumped Warbler.





I both saw and photographed these guys last year. But I have the impression that there are more around this year, and I got some good photos of an especially handsome bird with a dumb name.

Chestnut-sided Warbler.
The chestnut-sided Warblers seemed to be more abundant, in more areas, and easier to photograph, except my guys are always in a windstorm.

Chestnut sided Warbler.


Chestnut-sided Warbler.


Nashville Warbler?


Nashville Warbler?



I have this guy pegged as a Nashville or Connecticut immature, but I'm not certain got any idea?

Female Pine Sisken


Female Pine Sisken.




If anyone remembers an earlier post, I featured a little female pine sisken on my picnic table who in the midst of food was napping. I'm sure this is her again, and she's all grown up.

American Woodcock.


American Woodcock.




Definitely not Warblers! These photos of an American Woodcock were a first for me. I'm amazed that the bird was on this trail as the fox hunts here regularly.






A Post to WBW@http://pinerivereview.blogspot.com/

42 comments:

  1. these are all great, gary! except for the pine siskin and yellow-rumped, i don't get to see any of these other birds here in texas. just wonderful.

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  2. You got some terrific shots, Gary. I particularly like the Yellow Warbler, for me the quintessential bird of summer... also the Redstart is beautiful. The bird that you think may be Nashville W. is not a warbler at all but belongs to the flycatcher family. Note the upright posture typical for the flycatchers, also the dark tail. Would say it probably is an Alder Flycatcher. Nice post!

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  3. Wow, some great "gets!" Your new lens must be great fun, too.

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  4. They are all superb, Gary!

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  5. Your pictures are wonderful, Gary, as usual. I so enjoy reading your blog, because so many of the birds that you have, we don't. Or, at least I never see them. Some day, though, when I'm rich and famous, I'm going to get a camera with a better lens, so I can take great pictures, too.

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  6. Beautiful yellows ang oranges and the Woodcock is so cool!

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  7. Wow - truly magnificent shots! Love the vivid colours you've captured.

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  8. So many great shots of those little birds!

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  9. The Yellow Warbler must be a beatiful bird to see in the wild. I really like the American Redstart but the Yellow-rumped Warbler is my favourite.

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  10. Great photos as always. I love watching pine siskins in the yard--they're such cute little birds. It must have been so exicting to see the American Woodcock--a very interesting looking bird. I'm going to look it up and see if they live my part of the world.

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  11. Your photos never fail to excite the naturalist in us all. Thanks for sharing them.

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  12. Great Gary, the Warblers are superb.

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  13. I Knew I could count on you Hilke!! Thanks for the ID!!

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  14. Actually the lens is a year old now Lois, but it continues to amaze me!

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  15. You're rich enough and famous enough now Louise. Check the used lens on the web.

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  16. They are vivid aren't they ladyfi.

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  17. Aw Andrew you like them all.

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  18. This was the first time I've seen them Grace.

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  19. Thanks for the kind comments Joyful.

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  20. From a great photographer, those are kind words Bob.

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  21. Great photos. I agree that it's good to see a new bird but but an even bigger thrill to get good photos.

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  22. Amazing photos of all these beautiful birds!

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  23. you got a problem. Lots of birds to share and too little room to do it.

    Check out my "Winged" tomorrow evening. You can show everything with wings. :)
    NF Winged

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  24. Great post and captures Gary!

    You should try Wordpress. It's not as contrary as Blogger.

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  25. Great shots- most of these are not around here.

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  26. Incredible captures!! Aren't warblers fun? This spring I saw so many, but they didn't stay still enought to photograph, and I don't have a fancy lens. Enjoyed your post!! ~karen

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  27. I think I don't spend enough time in the field and too much on the computer, NF.

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  28. So many lovely captures! You live/hike in an avian paradise!

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  29. Gary, this is an absolutely stunning collection of tiny birds.

    By the by, what is your new lens?

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  30. Lovely bird shots. The Yellow Warbler is particularly dazzling.

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  31. We're fortunate to be here BRC. By the way Thanks from Boomer he has his very own following.

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  32. Thanks Arija. It's the sigma 150-500mm but I think I'm growing into it.

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