Sunday, July 29, 2012

More Strange Sightings at the Vermilon River. A post to OWT, WBW IRBB.

As I mentioned in the last post, we had thunder storms earlier in the week. There was not enough rain to make much difference to the level of the River or wetlands. Despite the drought however, it was an eventful week in terms of wildlife. The post is a combination of hikes to the west side of the River and the east track beaver ponds and wetlands.
The first photo is a reflection in the beaver pond; the second and third, different views of the Moose Lake wetland.
THIS POST IS SET UP FOR THE SLIDE SHOW AS USUAL, BUT I SUGGEST YOU READ THE COPY FIRST.

A post to Our World TuesdayWild Bird Wednesday and I'd Rather Be Birding.
 Reading the copy is important as new births are showing up, and there new sightings as well. My thanks to NWO Birds for their help in Id'ing some of the new sightings.
 To those of you who live on the coasts of North America or the Great Lakes, shore birds are not rare, but to Boom and I who live in a wilderness characterized by small lakes and various sized rivers they're both rare and exciting.

Yes I found the missing memory card, which has prompted me to wonder if I'm playing with a full deck. On that card were these photos of a Solitary Sandpiper. They were taken at the east track beaver pond.




 I'm always pleased to see the ravens whether in flight or perched.

 They are our totem bird, and always seem to bring good sightings, and exciting events.
 I had been looking for the female Northern Harrier, and in fact found her, and her offspring, a juvenile Northern Harrier. He/she was perched on a stump in the tundra, a far distance away. I hike and photograph, and therefore don't carry a tripod, because of the extra weight. I had to hand hold the camera with the 150-500mm lens mounted on it, standing on the abandoned railway tires. I was quite pleased with these shots.
Juvenile Northern Harrier

Side view.

 In the same tundra I saw the American Bittern. Unfortunately, when he lands and settles in, you can't see him, but I got this in flight shot.
 This little series plays the identification game with sparrows, a risky and frustrating task at the best of times. This is song sparrow.
 I have been calling these little guys everything from Juvenile sparrows, which is the safest call to swamp sparrows.
Juvie Sparrow.

Same.

Same.

 They may be great at posing, but they have few markings on them yet, which doesn't help with identification.
 Well,the mystery cleared up when mom showed up. She's a White-throated Sparrow.
Adult Catbird

Black-capped Chickadee.

Same

Eclipse Male Mallard in flight.

Male Goldfinch

Same.

  This Male Common Yellow-throat showed up. I had originally identified the two next photos as female Yellow-throats, until Ken posted his comment. I won't go along with a female Chestnut-sided Warbler (the brown side stripe is fainter), but I will a non-breeding immature Chestnut-sided Warbler.Non-breeding plumage since it's fall will now appear up here to drive me crazy, especially in the warblers.
Immature Chestnut-sided Warbler
Same




Mourning Cloak.

Great Spangled Fritillary.

Clouded Sulphur.

Common Buckeye. Thanks to Texwisgirl.

Side View Buckeye, normally a southern Butterfly.

Male Crimson-ringed Whiteface.
Canadian Tiger Swallowtail

 This is a brand new sighting. It's a Black-throated Green Warbler. The photo was taken on the west side of the River.
Same

 I've posted Fireweed before. But this shot shows clearly its propensity to bloom from the bottom of the flower. When the top starts to bloom, the bottom flowers will be producing a long silky seed.
Fleabane

Fleabane.

 On the last post, Jeanelle identified this flower as Bouncing Bet. The leaves contain saponin, which produces a soapy lather when mixed with water. Bouncing Bet is the old English name for a washerwomen. Source: ROM Guide: Wildflowers of Ontario.
Viper's Bugloss

Canada Thistle.

Talk about a bit of confusion. There was a commotion on the surface of the Beaver pond which I saw as a duck initially in the viewfinder, but behind the duck was the primary resident of the pond, the beaver. You have to freeze with these guys or they'll slap the water and disappear. You also have to cross your fingers and hope he comes toward you to get some closeups.
Close Up

Close up

Chipmunk

72 comments:

  1. I'm glad you found your missing memory card. Amazing shots. Love seeing the harrier and the beaver. Enjoyable post.

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  2. you met some waders today. Congrats to that one. Love the butterflies.

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  3. chippy is too cute!

    i think that's a buckeye butterfly. :) liked all your sparrows peeking out from the trees.

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    1. Thanks. That's what it is. Normally a southern butterfly.

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  4. Very nice. The chipmumk is a cutie. :)

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  5. Spectacular photographs! I love that Northern Harrier!

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  6. Hey Boom & Gary.
    Very nice post as always ..... I love to see / read it. THANKS!.
    Really like the picture of the Canadian Tiger Swallowtail, I'm "crazy" with butterflies.
    Last Friday we saw a White Admiral - Limenitis camilla, it is very rare in Denmark, not seen in NSW since 1986 acc. Wikipedia.
    Wishing you a great Sunday evening.
    Hanne Bente

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    1. White Admiral have been common this year here.They're beauties.

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  7. From butterflies and moths, to chipmunks and beavers....flowers and what I'm here for--------stupendous photos of the birds. What a great array of images you share today, and always!!!

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  8. Was für wundervolle Naturphotos, einfach herrlich.Ich liebe Tiere und die Natur.

    LG Mathilda

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  9. Fantastic large items on your post, I love the Female Common Yellow-throat, it is superb.

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  10. Great serie of shots!
    Have a nice evening!

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  11. THose juvenile sparrows are beautiful and the beavers fascinating. Love the warm sun reflection on his head.
    Paul

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  12. The female yellowthroat may be a female Chestnut-sided Warbler. It has a bright yellow crown and its eye ring is more distinct than I usually see in yellowthroats. Should have wing bars, not present in yellowthroat. Very nice series!

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    1. Thanks Ken. See my change in the post.

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  13. Gary you always give us more than our pennies worth; love the variety and wonderful captures each and every one

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  14. Amazing what the beavers can do.. Love your part of the country..

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  15. I love your critters, and butterfly shots! Gorgeous..

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  16. Hi Gary

    A lovely post I am glad you found your sandpiper.

    Boy you have a lot of warblers.

    Guy

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  17. Beautiful shots, thank you for sharing.

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  18. Wonderful captures as always! I, too, always love your critters, birds and butterflies! A delightful world it is!

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  19. Your photo's are as always beautiful, I am amazed at what you see there in that beautiful country of yours.

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  20. Terrific captures from your amazing world as always!

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  21. A wonderful post Gary your images are superb as always.

    Many thanks for all your recent comments re Mum.. It means a lot and she really enjoys seeing them on my blog.

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  22. It's always nice to see the circle of life at its beginning like this, nice post.

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  23. I love the sand-piper captures Garry ... a beautiful walk with your eyes peeled for the things of beauty.

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  24. Lovely series, Gary! The wetland and the birds are wonderful. The sandpiper is beautiful, great shots.

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  25. Delicious photos, my favorite pictures of the beaver swam, very handsome. Greetings.

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  26. What an amazing post with so many fantastic photos to see, learn, and admire!

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  27. The Solitary Sandpiper lookers very elegant! Am always awestruck by butterflies! And so is your capture of the mallard in flight -perfect shot!!

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  28. Wow! i am totally awed by your absolutely amazing photography and nature's critters that you capture ~ beautiful ~ words can not describe ~~ thanks, namaste, (A Creative Harbor)

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  29. Birds, butterflies, flowers and beasts, all is amazing. You find so many wonders.

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  30. I'm so glad you found the missing memory card. This was another delightful look at the scenery and wildlife in your neck of the woods. You are such a gifted photographer.

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  31. Amazing wildlife there! Great photos too!

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  32. Beautiful shots of the place.

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  33. Such amazing shots of the critters in your world.

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  34. your photos are lovely as usual. i particularly love the chipmunk. how adorable.

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  35. Hi there - great set of pictures - I like the beaver and chipmunk !

    Cheers - Stewart M - Australia

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  36. Ah, the sweet squirrels and even a beaver !

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  37. That is a brilliant collection indeed!!

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  38. I wish I could take photos of so many birds up close. Lucky you to be so close to nature. Thanks for sharing.

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  39. Thank you for showing me so many beautiful pictures of birds, nature and surroundings!

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  40. Great series. Glad you found the memory card with the beautiful sandpiper. Love the Bouncing Bet story. I wonder if we have the same lens (Sigma 150-500). I also do not carry a tripod, although "hiking" might be a bit pretentious a term for the walking I do around Vancouver :)

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  41. Wonderful photos. Just when I thought I found my favorite, the next one came along. Thanks for posting them and educating me on the bird names, now I'll know when I see them in the future. :)

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  42. Oh my goodness. I love the chipmunk images. Too cute.

    Thank you for your comment on my blog.

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  43. I'm constantly amazed at the marvelous shots you get on your hikes. The scenery is beautiful, but the photos of the animal and plant life are exquisite.

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  44. That's a fantastic post. I love the Solitary Sandpiper. What a lovely bird.

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  45. WOW!!! ... this is such a great post, with awesome portraits. great nature art photography!

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  46. Think you captured all these with your lens. Awesome. wonderful and so on:) Thanks for visiting my site:)

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  47. Beautiful photos and a great post.

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  48. Great blog. Interesting notes. ;P
    I like him here!!! ;)
    I am inviting to me: http://photographyismyexistence.blogspot.com/
    I am greeting I wish the nice evening! ^^

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  49. lovely to spot that harrier! Amongst all your other beautiful birds; you have such a bounty over there to enjoy Gary. I'm loving the little chipmunk too!

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  50. Another great post. I'm glad you stayed very still and got great photos of the beaver to share with us all. Very exciting to see that Solitary Sandpiper. My bird book says they are rare vagrants down here in Australia.

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  51. Amazing series..I live in western NY and the drought is terrible here too....I love all the photos and you have the one bird that I can id...the photo is a male mallard (yellow bill) in alternate plumage for their flightless molt soon to return to green headedness....Michelle

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  52. Beautiful pictures of the birds as always, and it's amazing the shots you get of butterflies.

    And I'm very happy to know you recovered your memory ;>)...I will come back to look at the slide show later1

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  53. You connect me to my favorite friends. Turtles one week and beavers the next. I appreciate your work very much!

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  54. Delightful-- really fantastic!
    kiss
    BShell

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  55. You always provide such a wealth of photos and commentary! I feel as if I have journeyed with you - without the long walk! Thanks for the great shots!

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  56. I am glad you found your memory card...now where did I put mine;') Oh to see a Harrier perched would be grand, but to also see one in flight...How marvelous. All of you images make me smile~

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  57. Great series again Gary. You show us so many pictures. Amazingly enough those Solitarys show up over here occasionally.

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  58. Very nice to see all of your great photos!
    Well done!
    Greetings from Pia in Sweden

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  59. Nice pictures of beautiful nature, animal and butterfly but I liked best to see all the different birds. There were many exciting species.

    Ottar

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  60. Superb images, thanks for sharing these wonderful views of your world.

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  61. Beautiful post! Such a great variety :)

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  62. Wonderful post - full of wild flora and fauna!
    Congratulations on sighting that Black-throated Green Warbler!

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  63. Love the yellow goldfinch and the butterflies. The first photo is beautiful with the reflections. Cute dog Boomer is. :) thank you for visiting my blog :)

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  64. Great and wonderful shots. You*e so good capturing these lovely different sides of nature :0)

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