Monday, June 6, 2011

Forest Flora Of the Vermilon River. A Post to My World Tuesday.

Pin Cherries


Just about finished their blooming stage, the pin cherries led off the riot of colour in the forest. But they're just not a pretty bush, they'll produce an edible, red berry that is perhaps a little tart, but perfectly enjoyable for all the wildlife, including me.

Blueberry


Blueberry



There is nothing to compare to a forest blueberry. They are small but infinitely sweet; in fact mine never make it home to be turned into jam or pies. Both the blueberries and the pin cherries are favourites of the bear so you may share a patch with a mom and her cubs or watch while she bends a pin cherry tree over for the kids.

Choke Cherry


Choke Cherries


Choke Cherry




The flowers are starting to look alike aren't they? Choke Cherry blossoms grow in bottle brush shape while Pin Cherries grow like apple blossoms. Pin cherry bark is red and the leaves turn red in the fall.
Choke cherry berries are edible and red also, but are bitter in flavour. The pits and bark contain prussic acid so keep them away from your pet as they're poisonous. Don't worry the bears and birds don't eat the pits, they already know!!



Mountain Ash
 Gees another one, the Mountain Ash is blooming also. See the difference in the leaves, and its berries are orange, and edible. They have an astringent taste and were used by many Aboriginals as a medicine.

Mountain Ash.


Wild Strawberries.


Wild Strawberries.


There are apparently two types of wild strawberries, but the end result is they produce small berries, which are really good to eat. They are probably the least numerous with blueberries and pin cherries, the most numerous respectively.

Wild Strawberries.


Wild Raspberries.




Not in flower yet, although I thought I'd show you this wild raspberry patch about the size of a stake truck. I pick the edges, but I think the wildlife with fur and the ability to fly are the real harvesters. The thorns are really sharp.

Johnny Jump Up


Johnny Jump Up



I think there are lots of names for these guys, all somewhat the same. They come in the most incredible colours.

Star flowers bloom, and are suddenly gone. They're the real forest dwellers along with Wild Lilly Of The Valley. Both like the moist, shady forest floor. The Lilly of the Valley is just starting to flower. The buds are showing below.

Star Flowers


Star Flower and Budding Wild Lilly Of The Valley.


Unknown


 I did know what the little purple guy is, but his name escapes me. He grows in the most inhospitable areas in the direct sun.


Woolly Violets


The wild violets are still growing. They're sun lovers so they're growing amongst the blueberry bushes. Quite a sight.

Woolly Violets.


Yellow Rocket


Yellow Rocket.



I showed these Rockets in an earlier post, but couldn't remember their names.

Unknown



Ever so often I run across something which refuses to be identified. I'd say this was a crab apple bush which escaped, or was thrown in the forest, and has adapted quite well.


The lilac tree is a prime example of the same. But it's on an abandoned cabin clearing, so it's explainable.


Lilac


Swallow Tail.





Of course with all the blooming, the insects are thriving. Just ask about the mosquito's and black flies. But nature gives the good and bad. Just look at these Swallow Tails feeding on the abundant nectar left in these pin cherry blossoms.


Swallow Tail.



A Post to My World Tuesday.

17 comments:

  1. Johnny Jump Ups!!! Such sweet little flowers. I love seeing them on forest walks. A wonderful series of photos Gary.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Gorgeous flowers and colors! Perfect pictures of the beauty of spring! I love the Swallowtail! Superb captures as always, Gary! Thanks for sharing the beauty! Have a great week!

    Sylvia

    ReplyDelete
  3. Spring is a delight in your part of the world.

    ReplyDelete
  4. just lovely to walk in the woods with you and your camera. thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nice yo see all that colour!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hiya Gary,
    You're really into flowers these days, aren't you?
    Very nice sequence. Lots of fruit in your woods.
    I reckon the unknown purple flower might be a vetch of some sort.
    We grow wild strawberries, which may sweet, but you need quite a few for mouthful :-)
    1jo.co

    ReplyDelete
  7. thank you for sharing all these beauty with us today. the earth does laugh in flowers, doesn't she?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Fantastic blog you have done, and you put up the Swallowtail butterfly, genius.

    ReplyDelete
  9. You know, I had no idea that blueberry flowers looked like this! Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Gorgeous flowers, I really like the Johnny jump up. The butterflies are gorgeous too. Great photos.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Beautiful flowers, lovely colors.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I've got some Johnny Jump-ups this year, too. I'm always so happy to see them.
    Love your blog, Gary.
    — K

    Kay, Alberta, Canada
    An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

    ReplyDelete
  13. The purple unknown one looks a bit like vetch.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Beautiful wildflowers and butterfly!

    ReplyDelete
  15. That really is a splendid set of pictures - is your unknown purple some form of Vetch? Only a stab in the dark really!

    The variety of flowers is great - and the swallow-tail seems a bit more obliging than some I've tried to snap!

    Cheers - Stewart M - Australia

    ReplyDelete
  16. Great series, Gary, so much to 'capture' this time of year, well done!!

    ReplyDelete
  17. All are beautiful but the Johnny Jump Up is truly amazing! I don't think I've seen this flower before.

    ReplyDelete