Wednesday, January 19, 2011

The Frosty Forest of the Vermilon River. A Post to Watery Wednesday

The Hills in Frost

Frost on needles


Frost on branches
Hoar frost is common during cold, clear weather but this session was the heaviest that I had ever seen. I, therefore, decided to post some photos, but also to find out what hoar frost is.  So I'm going to try and explain it simply, because I'm fairly simple.
Hoar frost forms on clear cold nights,and forms on objects that have been chilled below freezing by radiation cooling. It occurs when the relative humidity in supersaturated air is greater than 100%. The cold temperature and the cold object create a situation that the water vapor forms ice on the object directly. There is no in between solid water stage. If you look at the top photo, you'll see trees in the forefront that are green and have no frost on them. Likely the conditions were not right to take the vapour directly to ice.

Rime frost is not hoar frost. It is dew or liquid water that has frozen.It did not pass directly from vapour to ice.

I think we, in North America, tend  to use an imprecise English, especially since the social sciences have become so strong. We would normally just call this frost on the trees. An other example would be the substitution of issues for problems. This has been picked up by politicians so that now issues don't need to be solved, and  the term problem which requires a solution is never used.

For more information the best site was http://www.weatheronline.co.uk/

A post to Watery Wednesday @ http://waterywednesday.blogspot.com/

24 comments:

  1. I also hate it when people say 'issues' when they mean problems; and it's catching on over here now, too.
    Lovely frost pictures, and good explanations of the different types.

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  2. Thanks for the visit Jeremy and the kind words.

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  3. Last year we woke up to quite a few mornings of hoar frost. Not so this year...so far.

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  4. In Japan, this winter appears to be warmer than that of last year and I haven't seen frost as frequent as last winter. Since I am not into cold weather, just seeing your lovely frost photos is good enough:)
    Thanks for sharing.
    Yoshi

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  5. Interesting lesson about frost. It certainly makes the scenery pretty!

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  6. That it does Linnea.Thanks for the visit.

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  7. Interesting info! I had heard of hoar frost, but had always thought of it as a poetic expression for white frost. Re issues vs problems: right on!

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  8. I have heard of hoar frost, but, I didn't the time, lazy xxxxxx . Now, thanks to you, I have learn a bit. Beautiful trees.

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  9. I love Hoar frost on the trees...looks so amazing. Nice pics, and explanations, Gary and Boomer...

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  10. we had a lot of it earlier. But this past week we had some thawing so now it is only dirty. :(

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  11. Hi Hilke. I think it is a term that is disappearing a la issues vs problems.

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  12. Hi Bob. Glad you enjoyed the post.

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  13. I knew you'd know the proper name Bonifer.

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  14. To NatureFootstep. Well that happens but it sure is breath taking when its fresh.

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  15. Absolutely stunning photos. And, I learned something new once again...I love when that happens. Hoar frost, it's gorgeous.
    BlessYourHearts Hi Boomer

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  16. Very pretty! By the way, your dog is beautiful :) If you have time, check out my post here www.adventureswithjessica.blogspot.com . I’m trying really hard to increase my number of followers and could use your help! Thanks!

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  17. Hi Dominic. Thanks for the visit.

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  18. Hi Dar. Thanks for the visit. Great that you enjoyed the post.

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  19. Hi Jessica. Glad for your visit. Boom always appreciates compliments.

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  20. WATER, AH, WATER

    Water as river or puddle or frost;
    Water that’s roaming alone and seems lost;
    Water that looks like sharp daggers of ice;
    Water that’s frozen as small as white rice;
    All of this water, no matter where found
    Will one day seep back far, far underground
    And surface again for fountain and flush—
    Water, ah, water, you make things so lush!


    © 2010 by Magical Mystical Teacher

    Roiling River

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  21. frosty forest indeed..makes for excellent photos- great job!

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  22. To MMT. Thanks for the poem and visit.

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  23. Again Johnny. Thanks for the visit and words 'cause you're a superbe photographer.

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